Video of the Week: Nutrition for rowers, pt. 2

A couple years ago I posted a video on nutrition for rowers that included a ton of great info on getting the proper nutrition to fuel your training. You can check that post out here. Above is another video from a rower who talks about his diet, general nutrition strategy, and some of the different approaches that are out there (some good, some not). If you’re heading to college in a few weeks and are trying to figure out how you’re gonna get the calories you need (especially if you’re faced with the prospect of not having your mom cook all your meals anymore…), this is a good video to watch.

Coxswain recordings, pt. 32

Before we get into today’s recordings, if you’re looking to squeeze in one last camp before the summer’s over, check out this camp being hosted by the Kent School in Connecticut. (One of the better recordings I’ve listened to in awhile was from a Kent coxswain – it’s the second one in this post.) The dates are August 6th – 12th, you get to stay in the dorms on campus, row out of their boathouse, etc. The camp is new this year so if you go, let me know what it’s like so I can be sure to include it in future camp posts.

Mount Baker V8+ Steady State

This is a quick clip of some steady state with Mt. Baker’s varsity eight from 2014 and is just another good example of how to cox your crew through low rate pieces like this. The tone of voice, calls, etc. are all solid and there’s a good mix of positive reinforcement, technical pointers, and calls for individual adjustments.

Penn AC Junior Men Practice Recording

Bart sent me this recording last year and I ended up sharing it with several other coxswains (including a couple at MIT) so they could see what I meant when I talked about being more engaging, active, assertive, etc. when calling the warmup and drills. Because we tend to do the same warmup and drills most days of the week it’s easy to kind of zone out and just go through the motions, which can translate to you sounding super monotonous and bored.

Here’s part of the reply I sent to Bart after I listened to this: “My one suggestion would be to slow down what you’re saying. I like the conversational tone you have (that’s how I cox too) but there are times when you’re saying so much and you’re saying it so quickly that it can hard to process it all, especially when you’re doing stuff that’s so technically focused like you were here. Everything you’re saying is good and exactly what you should be communicating to the crew, just try to slow down the pace of your speech so that the rowers can take the feedback you’re giving them and incorporate it without first having to redirect their focus to try and figure out what you said. Tone, annunciation, etc. were all excellent throughout though.”

Rather than write out every technical call he makes as a “call I like”, just take note of pretty much everything he’s saying. Between bladework, body positioning, timing, acceleration, picking the boat up, etc. there’s like, 50 easily discernible calls in here that you can take in the boat with you. Note how he says things too – tone and enunciation is key.

Music to erg to, pt. 152

If you caught my Instagram story over the last week and a half you’ve seen a few sneak peeks of what the new site looks like. Slowly but surely it’s coming along! My goal is to have it done before school starts (so end of August/beginning of September-ish). I know I’ve kinda been teasing this for awhile (I’ve been trying to work on this for over a year…) but I’m really excited that it’s finally coming to fruition and at the point where it’s almost done. Can’t wait for you guys to see it!

Video of the Week: How to get back into a flipped shell

All of this is great info that you should learn when you first get on the water, regardless of whether you’re in an eight or a single. In most cases you can’t take out small boats until you’ve demonstrated that you can get back into it in the event that it flips so this would be a good video to study so you’re prepared if/when you have to do that.